Summer Session: Week 19 Boxletter and Contents

  • Jubilee Fresh Whole Wheat Flour
  • Celeriac
  • Parsnips
  • Collard Greens
  • Winter Squash
  • Brussels Sprouts
  • Shallots
  • Leeks
  • Radish
  • Lettuce

 

*as always this list may change a bit once we get out in the fields to harvest

 

Recipes

 Week 19.  You’ve nearly made it through 5 months of eating locally and seasonally, good job!  We’ve definitely transitioned to the fall now filled with hearty roots and greens.  We have a special treat this week, our very own whole wheat flour!  This is made from wheat grown and ground right here on the farm.  This is the first grinding we have done with this years wheat.  This flour works great with most recipes calling for whole wheat flour and doesespecially well with quick breads and cookies. 

Happy eating!

-Liz

 

Root Veggie Pot Pie

A great use for all of these roots we’re getting these days.  An even better use for those roots that maybe get away from you for a couple weeks and maybe are a little less firm and perfect.  Shove em in a tender buttery crust and no one will complain. 

 

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 cloves of garlic, minced

½ medium onion, chopped

1 medium leek, sliced in half moons

1 celery stalk, chopped

1 medium carrot, diced

1 medium parsnip, diced

1 C celeriac, peeled and diced

⅓ cup all purpose flour

2 cups vegetable broth

2 teaspoons fresh thyme

¼ teaspoon salt, more to taste

½ cup milk

2- 9 inch pie crusts, homemade or store bought

Egg wash

1 egg, beatened

1 tablespoon milk

 

Preheat the oven to 400F.

In a large pot, add a little bit of olive oil and allow it to heat for about a minute. Add the minced garlic and diced onions, and cook them over low heat for a minute or two until aromatic. Next, add diced celeriac, parsnips, carrots, celery to the pot, and cook for several minutes until they all become soft and tender. Add water or vegetable broth as needed to prevent the bottom from burning.

Use a whisk to stir in the flour, which will serve as a thickener for the sauce. Add fresh thyme and season with salt. Then pour in the vegetable broth. Stir to evenly incorporate all the ingredients.

Once the vegetables and sauce has thickened, add the milk. Stir until well combined. Remove the pot from heat, and set aside for now.

Press a rolled out pie crust against a 9 inch pie dish. Pour the root vegetable filling into the pie crust.

Cut a second pie crust into strips and weave in and out to create a lattice pattern. (Or don’t, and just lay it over the top, crimping the edges together to seal. Just cut a few slits in the tops to let it breath a bit).

In a small bowl, whisk together a large egg and a tablespoon of milk. Use a pastry brush to brush this egg mixture over the pie crust to help it brown.

Set the pie on a large baking pan and bake the pot pie for about 30-35 minutes until the crust is golden brown.

Remove the pot pie from the oven and set it aside to cool down completely before cutting into it. If you cut into the pie before it cools, the pie will fall apart.

Serve the root vegetable pot pie warm.

 

Maple Parsnip Cookies

Parsnips are super sweet and amazing in baked goods.  I often do a swap with carrots in carrot cake and make parsnip cake, no one ever is any the wiser.  I’m in the middle of a batch of these cookies right now and you do need to let the cooked parsnips cool down quite a bit, but the thought of toasted pecans in little maple-y parsnip cookies has me carrying on.

 

1 ½ C maple syrup

¾ C grated parsnip

½ C mild veg oil

1 egg, beaten

1 tsp salt

1 ½ C flour

2 tsp baking powder

¼ C milk

1 ½ C rolled oats

½ cup chopped, toasted nuts

 

Preheat oven to 350F.

Simmer the maple syrup and parsnips in a medium saucepan until the parsnips are soft.  Remove mixture from heat and let cool.  Beat the oil and maple syrup in a medium bowl until light.  Add the egg and mix thoroughly.

In a separate bowl, sift together the flour, salt and baking powder.  Add the dry ingredients to the maple syrup mixture in two parts, alternating with the milk.  Stir well.

Stir in the nuts and oats.

Drop by spoonfuls onto cookie sheet.  Bake at 350F for about 15 minutes.

 

 

Caldo Verde (Portuguese Green Soup)

The perfect no frills, one pot meal.  Any kind of greens can be used here and in addition to that potato feel free to add in diced celeriac, parsnip, rutabaga or anything your little heart desires. 

 

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 medium yellow onion or large leek, finely diced

3 medium cloves garlic, minced

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

About 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 large russet potato, peeled, quartered, and cut into 1/4-inch slices

2 medium Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled, quartered, and cut into 1/4-inch slices

6 cups homemade or store-bought low-sodium chicken stock

1 bunch collard greens or kale, tough stems removed, leaves roughly chopped

12 ounces cooked linguiça or other garlicky pork sausage, cut into 1/4- to 1/2-inch slices

 

Heat butter in a large Dutch oven or saucepan over medium heat until melted. Add onion (or leek) and garlic, season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring frequently, until softened but not browned, about 5 minutes, adding olive oil as necessary to keep the mixture loose and moist.

Add potatoes and stock and bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally. Add kale and continue to cook until russet potato slices have completely broken down (you can press them with a spoon or potato masher for an even thicker texture), the Yukon Golds are tender, the greens have softened, and the soup has thickened to a creamy consistency, 25 to 30 minutes. Stir in sausage. Season soup to taste with salt and pepper and serve garnished with chives, if desired.

 


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s